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Posts Tagged ‘Perspective’

Warm-ups

20 Oct

Before heading into the studio to attempt any ‘serious’ art work, I often need to warm up by drawing something in my sketchbook.

These little drawings are typically unrelated to any project at hand.  Working at home, I tend to draw the nearest dog.  I find this exercise to be an amazing warm up to thinking clearly.  It’s like meditation, only without so much tedium.  But what if you work in a more traditional office environment?  This exercise can still be a valuable one, provided you have on hand some simple drawing tools and ‘objects de art’ that you find interesting.  These can take the form of found items from nature, or an interesting coffee mug or pen that you like the look of.  It can really be anything.

Place your chosen object on your desk, not too far from view and open your sketchbook.  Now spend a few minutes looking at the object.  Pick it up and find your favorite angle of it.  Can you identify simple shapes in the object that might simplify it at first glance, such as circles, triangles, rectangles, etc?  Now, without too much thought, pick up a pen or pencil and without looking too closely at your paper and keeping your eye mostly on the object, begin making a line drawing that traces these broad shapes.  Try to get a basic outline and then continue to fill in where one shape moves to another.

This may feel (and look) ridiculous at first, but it is truly the first step in learning to draw.  You can practice this simple exercise in about 5 minutes, with the same object, each day, and see how it progresses.   You will see progress in what your drawings look like.  But beyond that, you will notice a little something about how you feel as you make these little drawings.  You might find that your mind gets into a different groove and that you are thinking differently.  A little less restless.  You may even find that sometimes great ideas pop into your head as you draw.  Even a simple drawing exercise such as this one can get your mind working in a new way.  Practicing this can be a valuable tool in pushing the boundaries of your normal day to day modus operandi.

Find an object that you find interesting and give sketching it out a try.  Then try it again the following day. Let us know how it goes.

Here are a couple more fossils of mine to inspire….

Related: How changing your perspective changes your results.

Popularity: 15% [?]

 

Drawing is Seeing.

09 Oct

James McMullan teaches basic drawing skills every Friday, through writing. His New York Times series, ‘Line by Line,’ showcases the value of drawing as a way to see the world, and the relationships of objects within it.

Try his lessons to help make your sketches, drawings, notes that much more engaging.

Also, checkout our posts on templates for drawing out ideas, drawing a landscape, and how changing perspective changes your results.

Popularity: 26% [?]

 

How changing your perspective changes your results.

10 Jun

Drawing is all about relationships, as is business. In order to succeed in either, we need to see the big picture while also seeing the details which comprise it. Unless we spend time working from multiple perspectives, we’ll always see the same picture, and jump to the same conclusions, and deliver the same results.

Practicing drawing allows us to permanently change the way we think in business scenarios. This is our brains’ neuroplasticity reacting to our intellectual needs. “[Drawing] requires that one confronts and deals with paradoxes. For example, we can know that a ceiling is flat and the corner is a right angle. But on the picture plane, the edges of the ceiling are not horizontal and the corner angles are not right angles at all.” – Betty Edwards, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain

Through drawing, we are forced to practice whole brain thinking… comparing what we know and what we see to deliver a defined result. Let’s get started with an example.

Here is my original sketch. I was doing a mental sketch of a horse and elephant, pretty basic. Analyzing my sketch, you can see that I understand:

  • that a horse is smaller than an elephant,
  • both have four legs, and
  • elephants have a funny little tuft at the end, well suited for swatting flies in Disney movies.

Despite my practice drawing, my results continue to be the same when I don’t truly examine the object I’m drawing, and how all its components relate.

Luckily… I found a horse who was very eager to be my subject matter. (It may be more of a mule or colt, judging the size.)

Once I had a specimen which I could observe to evaluate the relationships of all the components (hooves, tail, mane, body)… my sketches became a bit better. You can see that I included additional details my original sketch didn’t, such as the defined muscles. However, I was still having a hard time breaking from the mental model in my head, an animal with a mane, tail, and four legs which was facing to the right. In order to change my results, I needed to change my perspective and challenge those paradoxes.

Luckily, I found an elephant. I couldn’t fit them both in my sketch easily, a happy accident, so I decided to change up the perspective, and sketch them straight on. A fearsome duo for sure.

Here you can see horses #4 and #5, before I changed my perspective. Notice however, the dramatic difference between the new horse and elephant (below the line) and the earlier sketches. From this new perspective, I had no Disney summary stuck in my head of what a true horse sketch should look like. I had no assumptions to fall back on. I had to really see my subject and analyze the relationships of all the components to create the final drawing.

I was astounded by the changes, so I figured I’d try it again. This time from the backside.

Again, I was very surprised with the turnout. Much better than when I first began sketching a horse 15 minutes earlier. It was my first horse sketching experience, and I’ll try again on a real horse sometime.

In business, we are forced to move fast and race onto the next project. Problem, Solution, Check, Done!

Einstein has a fantastic quote: “It’s not that I’m so smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.”

Spend that extra 20% of time on a project. Think it through, especially once you think you’ve got it figured out. Try to draw and redraw your conclusions. Visualize your business problem, and ask others what they think. You’ll learn that the relationships you initially define of people, places and things in your work may be a bit off, and you’ll be glad you learned sooner rather than later.

Also, try drawing an object from memory, and then from sight. Change the perspective.

Share your thoughts below!

Popularity: 62% [?]

 
 



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