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Posts Tagged ‘Arts Enterprise’

The Lost Art of The Proposal: Get paid for anything!

26 Feb


After participating in a panel on ‘The Portfolio Career’ at the Arts Enterprise National Summit,  I felt a need to share some practical advice on how I find more of the right work at P&G and in the ‘real world.’ Here’s how:

So.. you’re freelancing… or in human terms… you have some skill you want to use to make some extra cash. But no one is buying it!

Well, don’t just sit there, find someone who can use your help and PROPOSE to help them.

Your job is no longer to do XYZ.

Your job is now to:

  1. find people who can benefit from you doing XYZ,
  2. explain to them how you doing XYZ will help them, and
  3. THEN do XYZ.

Here’s a bit more practical advice on getting this done…

  1. Do an 80:20 Analysis. Look at how you spent your time this week… if you really get objective, you’ll notice that about 80% of your positive results came from 20% of the time you spent. Summarize what you do well, most easily, and try to do more.
  2. Develop your tagline. Write down 2-5 words that summarize what it is you do well, across all the work you find yourself doing. Maybe you’re a ‘Product Developer’ or a ‘Musician with Project Management Skills’ or a ‘Visual Artist with Creative Leadership’. Use this to quickly introduce to others how you can help them.
    1. Try the Harvard Business School Elevator Pitch Builder if you’re really stumped.
  3. Develop your portfolio. You need a quick, simple, and engaging summary of great work you have done in the past. Use this to prove to other that you can help them.
    1. Build your page on About.Me. It’s really simple, looks great, and it can aggregate your content from other social media. Only aggregate the content if that helps support your tagline and it relates to what you learned in your 80:20!
  4. Start writing proposals. Now that you’ve defined ‘This is me. This is how I can help.’… go find people who could use your help and write a quick email, or better yet, physical letter dropped off in-person explaining, ‘This is you. This is me. This is how I can help you.’ Include your tagline and links to/a copy of your portfolio. Make sure to spend some time to understand their problem, and if possible, find a reference or person you can connect with directly, rather than just leaving the proposal with someone random. Drop them off, and follow up on them.

Creativity comes through restraint… find a way to make the most of the resources and skills you already have.

Here is more thinking on how to sell what you already do.

Popularity: 62% [?]

 

How to build a creative juices pump.

25 Feb

DISCLAIMER: This works much better with 25+ cool people.

Arts Enterprise is a group effort to break down the silos between art and business. I’m still buzzing from the summit this past weekend.

Before we can merge the world of art and business… we must break down personal barriers between everyone attending our conferences and presentations.

Here are two techniques I practiced this weekend to get creative juices pumping, and people excited.

The Reciprocity Ring

Chris Genteel, Business Development Manager at Google, got everyone at the summit stirred up and mingling within 30 minutes. Each participant came to the conference with things in mind they’d like to accomplish. The Reciprocity Ring (by Humax Networks) was an activity that had each of us voice three things we could use help with, related to arts/business or not. What resulted was an instant connection of people willing and able to help each other.

  1. Get a big ring of dots on the wall. Provide some pens nearby.
  2. Give everyone a sticky note, and ask them to write three things they could use help with, related to the conference or not.
  3. After a few minutes, gather everyone around the big ring of dots on the wall, and ask people to one-by-one share their three things they could use help with. When they’re done, ask them to write their name next to one of their dots, and place the sticky note next to it.
  4. Other people who can help that person with one of the three things should write an answer on a sticky, and place it on top of the persons plea, then draw a line between that person’s name and another dot with their name on it… showcasing the connection.
  5. After everyone shared and listed connections… open up the room for everyone to chat with people who have answers!

The Critical Run

So, you’ve got a big problem you’re trying to solve… its hairy, and you don’t know where to get started… you just want to have an open and engaging discussion about it.
  1. Get everyone who wants to chat it together dressed and ready to run.
  2. Appoint a leader who will guide the group on a 3 mile run. They must know the loop, be able to lead the pack, and be knowledgeable enough about the topic to foster discussion when its not flowing.
  3. Let the magic happen, and enjoy the run.
  4. Get a more formal discussion organized as a wrap-up, after people get a chance to get a drink or shower. :)

What techniques do you have to engage a big group?


Learn more about conducting The Reciprocity Ring or The Critical Run.

Popularity: 82% [?]

 

The edge is where the action is. Business-Design-Art-Music.

24 Feb

Amy and I are back from the Arts Enterprise Summit in Kansas City. It was so much more than a conference…

Back in the real world, I found myself explaining the experience to a colleague. This event was special not because of the content of the slide decks or the caliber of the speakers, but rather the combination of all the people. This was the intersection of a network passionate about business, design, art, music, and everything in between.

The edge between all those worlds is where the action is… this is where you foster Diversity of Thought, the ability to see the same thing in many different ways, simultaneously.

As the summit was full of practicing musicians (more than I’ve ever spent time with!), I had the opportunity to explore how the musician thinks, the struggles their working community faces, and how they overcome it all to create a working piece of art and help the community grow.

Peter Witte, the Dean of the University of Missouri-Kansas City Conservatory of Music and Dance, had an enlightening quote about the growth of this creative organization: “Through music-making we learn to listen, to accompany, to support, to empathize, to work together… all non-verbally.

Every organization could use this kind of perspective.

If you haven’t had the opportunity to sit at the table with business professionals, freelance designers, visual artists, and practicing musicians to discuss creative output and bringing new ideas to the world… do it. This event was a pinnacle example of whole-brain thinking… so many quick wits, so many interesting perspectives, so many memorable jokes!

Now, I must get back to training for karaoke next year.

Popularity: 49% [?]

 

Grab your sketch book and go!

18 Feb

This weekend sees the Drawing Down the Vision team heading to Kansas City to attend and present to the 2nd annual Arts Enterprise Summit.  Adam and Amy will both be participating in a number of discussion panels on the nature of creativity as a focal point in the future of many disciplines in business and the arts.  We will also be presenting a special version of the Drawing Down the Vision workshop to summit attendees who will have the opportunity to participate in some of the exercises we use and to hear about our latest research in the relationship between drawing and how we think.  We are looking very forward to meeting others interested in the nature and future of creative thinking.  If you are anywhere near the Kansas City area, it’s not too late to attend the summit.  We’d love to see you there!!

Popularity: 45% [?]

 

Presenting at the Arts Enterprise National Conference

02 Aug

AE. Arts Enterprise. The Art of Business. The Business of Art.

Amy and I are honored to be presenting at the Arts Enterprise National Conference on February 19-21, 2011 in Kansas City, MO.

The primary goal of the conference is to help more national chapters get started. The secondary goal is for businesses such as Procter & Gamble, Apple, Google, Disney, Dreamworks and other to connect with bright students who work at the intersection of art and business – what we’re all about!

If you recall, we originally connected with Nate Zeisler, the co-Founder and Executive Director of Arts Enterprise, discussing  promoting diversity of thought. Nate is doing an awesome job organizing the event and pulling all the national chapters together.

Comment below if we can look forward to helping you start an Arts Enterprise Chapter at your school or connect your business with Arts Enterprise!

You can follow Arts Enterprise on Facebook and Twitter or read the Arts Enterprise Annual Report.

Popularity: 9% [?]

 

Promoting diversity of thought.

09 May

Creative Thinking

Amy and I had the great opportunity to meet with Nate Zeisler. He is the co-founder of Arts Enterprise, an organization dedicated to promoting entrepreneurial and creative thinking through the intersection of art and business.

Nate’s work is closely related to ours here at Drawing Down the Vision. Arts Enterprise is building a university network of dedicated leaders in this burgeoning field promoting diversity of thought: new ways to think through solutions to the complex, multi-faceted problems our world faces.

The time is ripe for this shift in thinking for both the academic and business worlds, applying best practices from all walks of life. Richard Florida, author of ‘The Rise of the Creative Class‘, dubs today, ‘The Great Reset‘ (the name of his new book). We’re all challenged to find new and relevant ways to contribute to the ever-changing communities we live in, to make the most of the myriad resources we are presented with. This demands skills native to the traditional artist and entrepreneur, a new way of looking at the world. It demands people who can combine and teach creative and professional success.

If you know of other groups working towards a similar goal, please share below! We all have a lot to learn.

“We are all artists now.” – Dalton Conley, Elsewhere USA
‘The MFA is the new MBA.’ – Daniel Pink, A Whole New Mind

Popularity: 36% [?]

 
 



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